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Members: Introduce yourself / Re: New Member from Fort Collins, Colorado
« Last post by BRT-GTR on Today at 06:43:09 PM »
   Quote;      '' At the age of 66, I have either become tired, or more sensible; hopefully the latter….''

     In my case, I think it's a bit of both, just hit 70 this week ( or rather it crept up on me :D).

    The 59mm Oring is a static seal on the outside of the labrynth seal and generally doesn't give trouble.
    Early 350s had two separate air filters located one either end of the cross engine airbox. These broke up and were abandoned by BS after many expensive warranty claims for wrecked engines. This issue does not refer to the stainless metal mesh you would find behind your green filter foam.
     When I said the chrome bores need all the help they can get, I wasn't saying they are a weak point but they are susceptible to scratching from any dust or grit drawn in under the piston. Make sure the airbox and carb covers are carefully sealed to extend the life of your engine. Richard has claimed the bores are good for up 100K miles, a member in South Wales bought a bike with 40K+ on the clock and found the bores to be reusable.
       Enjoy your GTR as she is, too good to restore and they are only original once.
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Mine is the highest mileage 350 I've seen at 43,000+ miles, although there may be others out there. I've had it since '74 and rode it to work for many years. I use a modern synthetic 10w30 engine oil. Any modern engine oil is fine, even those with friction reducers. Since the BS 350 has a dry clutch, you don't have to worry about friction reducers affecting it as you would in the smaller BS bikes or any others with a wet clutch.

Karl, that is a fantastic ownership story.  if you have a picture handy, could you post on my thread here?  What is the most major work you have done to it and at what mileage?  what are the biggest or most recurrent problems you've had with your bike?  i am guessing you pay close attention to its maintenance, so probably not that many issues...  i am sure the bike looked like new when you got it in '74, and has been pretty amazing to be a part of it as both of you age together.  the dry clutch is indeed a very nice feature, especially on a production 2-cycle bike.  i have been happily running Amsoil Interceptor in my little Yamaha, and other injected 2-cycles over the years, and i just put a quart in the GTR.
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Mine is the highest mileage 350 I've seen at 43,000+ miles, although there may be others out there. I've had it since '74 and rode it to work for many years. I use a modern synthetic 10w30 engine oil. Any modern engine oil is fine, even those with friction reducers. Since the BS 350 has a dry clutch, you don't have to worry about friction reducers affecting it as you would in the smaller BS bikes or any others with a wet clutch.
4
I'm with you - don't overhaul the engine or anything else unless there are signs that it is needed. Treat it as you would any used car or bike.  As far as the engine is concerned, I know from experience that cylinders, pistons, rings and bearings are good for 40,000+ miles.  The crankshaft has an aluminum labyrinth center seal, so no worries there. The rubber seals on the ends of the crank can be hard after this much time, but don't require an overhaul to replace. Even wheel and steering stem bearings should be good since outdoor weather obviously hasn't been an issue with your bike. You might want to re-grease those bearings when you get a chance because the original lube probably didn't survive very well.

Karl, thanks for your thoughts which is exactly where I am at.  I also appreciate your thoughts on the durability of the various engine components.  That is really good to hear.  The needle bearing top and bottom is same as the Rotary Jet 80 which I have seen a couple examples with over 20,000 miles on odo, and still running strong.  Reading your post, and looking at parts book, very nice to know there is no rubber labyrinth seal, I do see a 59 mm O-ring. 

What I have done in the past, when recommissioning a bike that’s sat for decades and is in obvious need of deep attention is to completely dismantle the bike, sometimes even pulling engine and clean everything, new grease in all pivot points, including steering head, swing arm, brakes, etc.  I have found it’s a lot easier to see what needs address when the  bike is dismantled this far.

However, what I am thinking with this GTR, because so far it seems in amazingly fine order, is I will probably dismantle in sections, e.g., dismantle front end, clean, grease steering head.  Then do the same with rear end at another time.  As it is, the forks are not leaking, so I am really reluctant to take apart or molest anymore than is necessary; as you say, treat it like a used motorcycle and give it what it need, and nothing more.  The other surprising thing, is I feel no detent in the steering head, so I can assume it is not dried out.  And, the wheels spin very very freely.  I think I'll take out a drain screw and see what for oil looks like, base on what i see, change accordingly. 

As I am sure you have seen in your projects, this bike does not seem to have the horrid things one becomes accustomed to seeing in a bike this old.  It appears pretty obvious the GTR has had good owners over the past 5 decades.  Pretty amazing if you ask me.  Something I have to respect.

The other thing I probably should address is changing transmission oil.  The Owner's Manual calls for an SAE 10/30 engine oil.  Is there better lubricant you'd suggest, an appropriate weight oil designed for motorcycle transmissions...?

Karl, it seems your association with the Bridgestone motorcycle has been a long one...? what are the highest mileage GTR engines you've seen still in running condition (that maybe you wouldn't have expected to be in running condition)? 
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I'm with you - don't overhaul the engine or anything else unless there are signs that it is needed. Treat it as you would any used car or bike.  As far as the engine is concerned, I know from experience that cylinders, pistons, rings and bearings are good for 40,000+ miles.  The crankshaft has an aluminum labyrinth center seal, so no worries there. The rubber seals on the ends of the crank can be hard after this much time, but don't require an overhaul to replace. Even wheel and steering stem bearings should be good since outdoor weather obviously hasn't been an issue with your bike. You might want to re-grease those bearings when you get a chance because the original lube probably didn't survive very well.
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       Steve,
                 If you intend to ride her before overhauling, have a look at the air cleaner. The old thin foam or flock, as sometimes referred, (under the metal mesh) will have disappeared or detached itself. Add a new, thin, 1/4 inch layer of foam to the outside of the mesh. The chrome bores need all the help they can get to keep the dust/dirt out.
       Brian.

Hey Brian, thank you for your thoughts on the air filter.  I actually pulled the cover as soon as I got the bike Tuesday past, just to see what was in there for a filter, as I read some time back that the oem filter would break apart and sucked into the engine.  Thankfully, the old filter has been replaced prior with a piece of ¼” green filter foam, so I was happy to see that.
As to your comments about overhauling, in my earlier life, up until about less than 10 years ago, I would already have had the GTR on the lift, and at least more than partially disassembled.  A few years back I got an unmolested rusty ’65 Yamaha YG1-K Rotary Jet 80, and as I had one restored back in 2007, I went against my desire to restore it, and did a major sympathetic preservation/service, but as the original sprockets/chain and ign.points were serviceable, so I just cleaned points, adjusted gap, and checked timing which was good, it started right up and I have ridden it ever since, over 600 miles.

I am thinking I will do the same thing with the GTR, treat it as a used motorcycle, certainly/thoroughly inspect for anything needing serviced and/or replaced as necessary, otherwise as long as the oil leakage is not concerning, I am not going to fix anything that isn’t broke.  While oil leaks are not what I want, I have learned to live with some, especially owning a ’67 Royal Oilfield Interceptor Mk.1A….  The GTR runs so clean and well, I just don’t ant to take anything apart that does not need to be taken apart.  So, I think my intent with the GTR is to enjoy it as is, give it good care, and be diligent to anything that appears life threatening.  I am thinking any external seals/gaskets/sealing rings I find leaking, I should be able to replace, and anything needing tightening, I can tighten.

At the age of 66, I have either become tired, or more sensible; hopefully the latter….  Restorations take so much time and effort, and having done quite a few in the past decades, I am more selective than I’ve ever been before in terms of how I spend my time.  (attached a pic of my ’65 Rotary Jet.)




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Members: Introduce yourself / Re: New Member from Fort Collins, Colorado
« Last post by BRT-GTR on Today at 11:16:43 AM »
       Steve,
                 If you intend to ride her before overhauling, have a look at the air cleaner. The old thin foam or flock, as sometimes referred, (under the metal mesh) will have disappeared or detached itself. Add a new, thin, 1/4 inch layer of foam to the outside of the mesh. The chrome bores need all the help they can get to keep the dust/dirt out.
       Brian.
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Thanks fellows for your experience on oil leakage, i now have some areas to consider when i make some time to get the bike up in the air on the lift, hopefully this winter.  the leakage is not coming from any obvious or directly visible areas, so i am going to need to closely inspect areas where the leakage appears to be coming from and go from there.  When i get 'round to it, will post what i find.  in the meantime, i shall inspect for anything loose, oil banjos, connections, fittings, etc.
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Members: Introduce yourself / Re: New Member from Fort Collins, Colorado
« Last post by BRT-GTR on Today at 10:47:20 AM »
            Would fully agree with Karl's potential leakage points above and just add in any of the external seals, gearbox window and sump plug. The alloy sealing washers were Ok when new and annealed but now leak, use sealant or change to copper.  Leaks tend to weep and spread under the crankcase, can be hard to pinpoint source.
         The Thruxton seemed to fair better than I did, luckily she went down on a soft verge and my mate soon had her back on the road. As you imply, 'What a machine !!'.  The GTR would leave it standing from a start but he would then come steaming past me after about half a mile with that big pot firing at every lamp post  ;D :D ;D 8). They only made a 1000 proper Thruxtons, bet you wish you still had it.                                                         Brian.
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  i do have an oil leak or leaks (drips, nothing hideous), difficult to know where oil is leaking through or past, the underside of the engine needs to be cleaned....  is there a  place where the GTR's can be predicted to leak or usually/typically can be expected to leak from?

Mine has leaked from the gasket between the clutch housing and crankcase, oil pump union banjos and hoses, seals at shift shaft and transmission shaft on the left side and the small screws in the neutral switch.  I run Yamalube, which has a slight green color, in the injection, which lets me distinguish between transmission oil and injection oil drips. Also, if you have it on a stand and watching for leaks, I just recently realized that some of the shaft seals on the left side may not leak when the bike is standing straight up, but will when it's on the side stand due to the oil level being higher on the left side when leaning. That should have been obvious.  :-[
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